NewEnglandSkiHistory.com
CT
|
MA
|
ME
|
NH
|
RI
|
VT
SkiNewEngland.net
 
The Sugarbush South base area in 2005
Sugarbush Resort
Warren, Vermont
Status: Open
First Season:1958-59
Vertical Drop:2600 feet
Standing Lifts:5 high speed quads, 5 quads, 2 triples, 1 double, surface lifts
Past Lifts:
Left: The Sugarbush South base area in 2005
Recent NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News:
10/16/2021: Sugarbush Sets New England Record with $170 Lift Ticket
10/11/2021: Base Facility Projects Continue as Season Approaches
8/14/2020: Win Smith Retires from Sugarbush
8/2/2020: Signs of Uncertainty for the 2020-21 Ski Season
SkiNewEngland.net Profile

The Tale of Two Mountains

Located deep in the Green Mountains, Sugarbush is one of the largest ski areas in New England by most measurements. The northern peak, Mt. Ellen, is one of the highest peaks in Vermont at 4,083 feet in elevation. While today Sugarbush is composed of two ski areas connected by a transport chairlift, it was originally two separate entities.

Construction of Sugarbush

Construction of Sugarbush
Construction of Sugarbush

Luther Damon Gadd, son of engineering executive Luther Gadd and Vera Damon, grew up spending time at his family's homes in Maryland and Hawaii. After serving in the Navy during World War II, Gadd graduated from Yale and traveled the world, becoming engaged to Pennsylvania native Sara Rohm. After marrying in 1950, the couple moved to Hawaii, where Damon started a job at the Hawaii Visitors Bureau and Sara with the Honolulu Star Bulletin. After a year on the island, the couple set off for a year-long round-the-world trip, from which they published freelance articles and photographs.

In December 1952, the couple purchased the Ulla Lodge (later known as the Hyde Away Inn) in Fayston. At the time of the purchase, nearby Mad River Glen was one of only two chairlift-served ski areas in Vermont. The general manager at the time was Jack Murphy. In addition to operating the inn, the couple maintained an apartment in New York City while continuing to travel and produce freelance work.

In the spring of 1957, word emerged that Damon Gadd had applied for a lease of National Forest land in Lincoln Peak for the purpose of developing a ski area. Though an initial attempt to get the state to construct an access road failed that summer, development plans moved forward. Meanwhile, Jack Murphy left his post at Mad River Glen to be part of the new Sugarbush Valley Corporation. In the fall of 1957, the group received preliminary federal approval for the $1.4 million ski development from the United States Forest Service.

In March of 1958, the group secured a five-year tax exemption from the Town of Warren. On April 30, 1958, Gadd announced permits had been secured and that Sugarbush would open in December. The cornerstone of the plan was a 9,300 foot long, 2,388 foot vertical three-person gondola, reportedly the longest single-span lift in America. Around this time, the corporation owned 350 acres of land and leased 600 acres from the Green Mountain National Forest. Construction started on April 28, 1958. In May of 1958, the state highway board gave the Town of Warren approval to construct a 3.2 mile access road to the development with full reimbursement. By the end of the month, a "long straight slash" was cut up the mountain for the lift line. As the summer progressed, a crew of 70 was working on cutting trails, installing the lifts, constructing a 450-car parking lot, and building the base lodge. Dubbed the Valley House, the William S. Cowles designed base lodge included a cafeteria, a first aid room, a Sig Buchmayr ski shop, and a lounge named The Hangover. With the sheer size of the development, Sugarbush often overshadowed the construction of the comparatively-modest Killington Basin development that same year.

As the ski season neared, 88 gondola cabins arrived from Italy, with Felice Savio on site supervising the installation. Three main trails were cut, supplemented by gladed areas and a novice T-Bar slope. Peter Estin was named ski school director.

Sugarbush Opens

The Sugarbush Gondola
The Sugarbush Gondola

Though a December 20, 1958 debut was long-planned, the gondola was not quite ready. As a result, Sugarbush likely debuted that Saturday with its novice T-Bar, while the gondola was filled with sandbags for its inspection. The gondola likely opened a week later on December 27, 1958.

Following the debut winter, the gondola remained in daily operation for summer sightseeing.

The Legendary Castlerock Area Opens

Sugarbush circa the early 1960s
Sugarbush circa the early 1960s

While some ownership groups spend their funds up front and then settle into stagnation, Sugarbush kept the ball rolling as it headed into its sophomore season. A new Carlevaro & Savio double chairlift was installed on a peak located between Nancy Hanks Peak and Cutts Peak, complete with a mid-station. Called Castlerock, the new complex quickly developed a reputation for excellent expert skiing with the billing "hot shots only." In addition to the new lift and associated trails, two more trails were cut on the main mountain - Domino and Moonshine. The new lift passed its inspection at the end of December 1959, a few weeks after the start of the ski season.

The Valley House Double was installed for the 1960-61 season, serving three new trails. In addition, the access road to the ski area was rebuilt.

A Competitor Opens Next Door

Upper FIS at Sugarbush North in the early 1980s
Upper FIS at Sugarbush North in the early 1980s

Sugarbush's next big expansion took place in 1963 when the new Gatehouse Area debuted. Served by a double chairlift, the new area took stress off the gondola, while also helping work the ski area closer to a new real estate development. Scores of celebrities vacationed at the resort, giving it the nickname Mascara Mountain.

Also that year, Glen Ellen ski area debuted on nearby Mt. Ellen. Taking a not so subtle jab at Sugarbush's greatest vertical rise slogan, Glen Ellen claimed the "Greatest Vertical Descent in East" via its network of double chairlifts. With skiing exploding in the Mad River Valley, development took off as well. According to the Boston Globe, real estate values in the area doubled during the five year period following the debut of Sugarbush.

Not to be outdone, Sugarbush took back the spotlight in 1964, when Olympic gold medalist Stein Eriksen was hired to run the ski school. Not only did the ski school attract celebrities wanting instruction, but Eriksen's ski gymnastics entertained onlookers. Wanting a steep fall-line trail, Eriksen designed Stein's Run, which reportedly opened for the 1966-67 season.

Sigi Grottendorfer took over as ski school director for the 1967-68 season, as Stein Eriksen departed for Snowmass. That season saw a massive growth in snowmaking capacity, an expansion of the base lodge, and the opening of Middle Earth at Castlerock.

1968-69 was welcomed with the opening of I-89 from Concord, New Hampshire to Sharon, Vermont, making Sugarbush significantly easier to reach from the Boston area. Meanwhile, marketing director Phil Camp promoted a paint-a-gondola contest, which received a reported 4,000 entries.

During the winter of 1969-70, a young college student named Winthrop Smith skied in the Sugarbush Valley for the first time. He would return.

A new intermediate to expert glade area was constructed for the 1971-72 season, initially served by a 3,000 foot long Pomalift. The North Link area would later be renamed North Lynx.

The summit terminal of the gondola was destroyed by fire on December 15, 1972, leaving Sugarbush in a bind. In order to keep terrain open, a snowcat shuttle service was commenced. In addition, two rope tows were procured from the Groton Country Club in Massachusetts and installed to serve terrain above the Valley House chairlift, while plans were made to cut the Castlerock Connection to provide alternate access to the base of the upper mountain complex.

Sugarbush and Glen Ellen Become One

Sugarbush in the early 1980s
Sugarbush in the early 1980s

In 1977, the Gadds sold Sugarbush for a reported $4.2 million to Roy Cohen, president of coin-operated-laundry-equipment supplier Solon Automated Services. Shortly thereafter, circa the fall of 1978, Solon Automated Services purchased Glen Ellen ski area for a reported $2.4 million and renamed it Sugarbush North. Top to bottom snowmaking was reportedly installed at Sugarbush North for the 1979-80 season.

By the turn of the decade, the enormous resort was recording nearly a half million skier visits per year. Initially connected only by shuttle service, the United States Forest Service endorsed a massive expansion campaign in 1982 which would have connected the two areas. The full extent of this proposal was never achieved.

Following the 1982-83 season, ARA Services Inc. (the food services company which later became Aramark) purchased Solon Automated Services, with Cohen initially remaining as Sugarbush's CEO. The aging but still famous Sugarbush gondola was removed following the 1983-84 season, replaced with two new Poma triple chairlifts.

Following the 1985-86 season, ARA Food Services sold Sugarbush to Claneil Enterprises (a holding company for heirs of Tylenol creator MacNeil Laboratories Inc.) for a reported $14.5 million. Claneil embarked upon the next big lift infrastructure change for the 1990-91 season, as three aging double chairlifts at Sugarbush North were replaced with new Poma quad chairlifts. The Green Mountain Express was Sugarbush's first high speed detachable chairlift.

Enter Les Otten

In October of 1994, Les Otten's LBO Resort Enterprises Corp. purchased Sugarbush for a reported $9.1 million. With little time before the season, changes were relatively minor as compared to what was to come. A snowboard park was added on Which Way at Sugarbush North, while backcountry tours of Slide Brook commenced, complete with shuttle bus pick ups from German Flats Road.

Meanwhile, after years of stalemate under previous ownership, Otten approached the towns and environmental opposition groups and told them he "needed to connect the mountains, develop a snow-making pond, repair the infrastructure and build a hotel." Moving quickly, the parties were able to find compromises that allowed the projects to move forward.

For the 1995-96 season, a staggering four new quad chairlifts were installed at Sugarbush, three of them detachables. Perhaps the most eye-catching of the new lifts was the 11,000 foot Slide Brook Express chairlift, which allowed skiers to go from Sugarbush South to Sugarbush North in only a few short minutes, without having to take off their skis.

In addition to the Slide Brook, Sugarbush South saw the installation of its first detachable chairlifts, with the Gatehouse and Super Bravo quads providing high speed service to the lower portion of the mountain. Not only that, but a 63 million gallon snowmaking pond was constructed. Overall, Sugarbush received an estimated $17 million in improvements that year.

The following summer, LBO Resort Enterprises Corp. was rolled into American Skiing Company. Large scale capital investments were focused elsewhere.

Exit American Skiing Company

Construction of the new Lincoln Peak base area in 2006
Construction of the new Lincoln Peak base area in 2006

During the 2001 off season, American Skiing Company sold Sugarbush to Summit Ventures NE, Inc., headed by Win Smith (son of Merrill Lynch partner Winthrop H. Smith Sr.). The new ownership wasted no time in improving the area, as it replaced the legendary Castlerock double chairlift that same year. Sadly, only two months after closing on the ski area, Smith's business partner Joe Riemer died suddenly.

After finding new minority partners, an inconvenience on Sugarbush North was corrected for the following season. With the relocation of the Green Mountain Express in 1995, the bottom of the mountain was left without a high speed lift. To fix the skier flow, a new Green Mountain Express was installed for the 2002-2003 season, replacing its short lived fixed grip counterpart.

With Sugarbush still in the red and large projects on the horizon, Smith moved to Vermont full time and took over day-to-day management of the resort in 2004. In 2005, work on the Lincoln Peak Village was commenced at Sugarbush South. Phase 1 was completed in 2006 at cost of $40 million and included Clay Brook Residences, Timbers Restaurant, and the Gate House Lodge.

Sleeper (2019)
Sleeper (2019)

In 2007, the Vermont EB-5 Regional Center was rechartered. Under the EB-5 program, a foreigner can invest $1 million in an approved United States business (which must then create jobs), in exchange for a green card. With the Northeast Kingdom labeled a Targeted Employment Area, the minimum investment is cut in half to $500,000, making participating rural businesses such as Sugarbush more attractive. Using this program, Sugarbush looked to find the second phase of its base area development.

The aging Valley House Double was replaced with a new quad in 2015, marking the first new chairlift at Sugarbush in over a dozen years. The replacement of old chairlifts continued in 2017, when the Village and Sunnyside doubles were replaced with fixed grip quads.

After nearly 20 years of independent ownership, Win Smith announced in November 2019 that Sugarbush had been sold to Alterra Mountain Company. The acquisition was completed in January 2020, only two months before COVID-19 shut downs devastated the Vermont economy.

NewEnglandSkiConditions.com Reports
Month Average Percent of Terrain Open
December39%    (8 reports)39 Open
January79%    (5 reports)79 Open
February84%    (8 reports)84 Open
March89%    (6 reports)89 Open
April24%    (4 reports)24 Open
May5%    (1 report)5 Open
Recent Conditions Reports
Dec. 12, 2020 by thubs87
Packed Powder, Spring Snow
Feb. 29, 2020 by thubs87
Powder, Packed Powder
Feb. 9, 2020 by brianna
Powder, Packed Powder
Feb. 9, 2020 by rocket21
Packed Powder, Loose Granular
Jan. 31, 2020 by thubs87
Packed Powder, Variable Conditions
Sugarbush Resort on NewEnglandSkiConditions.com

NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News
Recent Articles
Sugarbush Sets New England Record with $170 Lift Ticket - Oct. 16, 2021
Base Facility Projects Continue as Season Approaches - Oct. 11, 2021
Win Smith Retires from Sugarbush - Aug. 14, 2020
Signs of Uncertainty for the 2020-21 Ski Season - Aug. 2, 2020
Lift Construction Progressing in Maine and Vermont - Jul. 1, 2020
2020 Lift Construction Season Could Be Worst in History - May. 9, 2020
Sugarbush Mt. Ellen Base Lodge Expansion Proposed - Feb. 14, 2020
Alterra Completes Acquisition of Sugarbush - Jan. 15, 2020
Alterra to Acquire Sugarbush - Nov. 13, 2019
New Racing T-Bar Proposed at Sugarbush - Sep. 6, 2019
Sugarbush Resort NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News Page

Expansion History
Project
Season
Castlerock
Open
1959-60
Gatehouse
Open
1963-64
North Lynx Peak
Open
1971-72

Image Gallery
1959-60 Eastern Ski Map1960-61 Eastern Ski Map1961-62 Eastern Ski Map1962-63 Eastern Ski Map1964-65 Eastern Ski Map1965-66 Eastern Ski Map
View All Images in Sugarbush Resort Image Gallery
Lifts
Click on lift name for information and photos
Standing Lifts
Installed
The Castlerock Double in 2005
Castlerock Double
Poma
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
2001-02
Gatehouse Express in 2006
Gatehouse Express
Doppelmayr
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
1995-96
The base terminal (March 2019)
GMVS T-Bar
Doppelmayr
T-Bar
2011-12
The Green Mountain Express in 2004
Green Mountain Express
Leitner-Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
2002-03
The Heaven's Gate Triple in 2004
Heaven's Gate Triple
Poma
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1984-85
The Inverness Quad in 2006
Inverness Quad
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1990-91
The lift line (November 2020)
KBRA T-Bar
Leitner-Poma
T-Bar
2020-21
The North Lynx Triple in 2005
North Lynx Triple
Poma
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1995-96
The bottom terminal (2016)
North Ridge Express
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
1995-96
The Slide Brook Express in 2004
Slide Brook Express
Doppelmayr
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
1995-96
The bottom terminal (2016)
Summit Quad
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1990-91
The base terminal (March 2019)
Sunshine Quad
Doppelmayr
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
2017-18
The Super Bravo Express Quad in 2004
Super Bravo Express
Doppelmayr
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
1995-96
The bottom terminal (2016)
Valley House Quad
Doppelmayr
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
2015-16
The base terminal (May 2018)
Village Quad
Doppelmayr
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
2017-18

Past Lifts
Seasons
The top terminal circa the early 1980s
Castlerock Double
Carlevaro & Savio
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1959-60
-
2000-01
The lift line (background) (1980s)
Gatehouse Double
Carlevaro & Savio
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1963-64
-
1994-95
The bottom terminal (2015)
GMVS Poma
Hall-Poma
Platter
1982-83
-
2019-20
The lift line circa the early 1970s
Gondola
Carlevaro & Savio
Gondola - 3 Person
1958-59
-
1983-84
Green Mountain Express
Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
1990-91
-
1994-95
Green Mountain Quad
Doppelmayr
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1995-96
-
2001-02
North Link Poma
Heron-Poma
Platter
1971-72
-
1994-95
North Ridge Double
Poma
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1981-82
-
1994-95
Spring Fling Triple
Borvig
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1977-78
-
2000-01
The bottom terminal (2015)
Sunshine Double
Stadeli
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1963-64
-
2016-17
Super Bravo Triple
Poma
Chairlift - Triple - Fixed
1984-85
-
1994-95
T-Bar
Hall
T-Bar
1958-59
-
1970s
Tranquilizer Poma Lift

Platter
1970s
-
1980s
The Valley House Double in 2004
Valley House Double
Carlevaro & Savio-Poma
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1960-61
-
2014-15
The Village Double in 2002
Village Double
Carlevaro & Savio-Poma
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1964-65
-
2016-17

Maps
2020-21 Sugarbush Trail Map
1958 Sugarbush Development Map1959-60 Sugarbush Trail Map1963-64 Sugarbush Valley Trail Map1964-65 Sugarbush Valley Trail Map1967-68 Sugarbush Valley Trail MapMid to late 1980s Sugarbush trail map
View All Sugarbush Resort Trail Maps

Year by Year History
Adult Weekend Full Day Lift Ticket; Adult Full Price Unlimited Season Pass
2020s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2021-22$185.202021-22 Ticket Price Graph2021-22 Season Pass Price Graph2021-22 Skier Visit Graph
2020-21$162.942020-21 Ticket Price Graph$1149.002020-21 Season Pass Price Graph7.1 daysDecember 9May 22020-21 Skier Visit Graph
2019-20$134.002019-20 Ticket Price Graph$1270.942019-20 Season Pass Price Graph9.5 daysNovember 22March 142019-20 Skier Visit Graph
2010s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2018-19$124.002018-19 Ticket Price Graph$1217.942018-19 Season Pass Price Graph9.8 daysNovember 16May 5415,5852018-19 Skier Visit Graph
2017-18$124.002017-18 Ticket Price Graph$1149.002017-18 Season Pass Price Graph9.3 daysNovember 16May 62017-18 Skier Visit Graph
2016-17$97.002016-17 Ticket Price Graph$1779.002016-17 Season Pass Price Graph18.3 daysNovember 23May 12016-17 Skier Visit Graph
2015-16$95.002015-16 Ticket Price Graph$1729.002015-16 Season Pass Price Graph18.2 daysNovember 26May 12015-16 Skier Visit Graph
2014-15$91.002014-15 Ticket Price Graph$1679.002014-15 Season Pass Price Graph18.5 daysNovember 22May 32014-15 Skier Visit Graph
2013-14$89.002013-14 Ticket Price Graph$1629.002013-14 Season Pass Price Graph18.3 daysNovember 22May 42013-14 Skier Visit Graph
2012-13$89.002012-13 Ticket Price Graph$1599.002012-13 Season Pass Price Graph18.0 daysNovember 17May 42012-13 Skier Visit Graph
2011-12$88.002011-12 Ticket Price Graph$1569.002011-12 Season Pass Price Graph17.8 daysNovember 24April 82011-12 Skier Visit Graph
2010-11$84.002010-11 Ticket Price Graph$1499.002010-11 Season Pass Price Graph17.8 daysNovember 25May 12010-11 Skier Visit Graph
2009-10$82.002009-10 Ticket Price Graph$1469.002009-10 Season Pass Price Graph17.9 daysDecember 6April 182009-10 Skier Visit Graph
2000s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2008-09$72.002008-09 Ticket Price Graph$1399.002008-09 Season Pass Price Graph19.4 daysMay 3296,3402008-09 Skier Visit Graph
2007-08$69.002007-08 Ticket Price Graph$1399.002007-08 Season Pass Price Graph20.3 daysNovember 17May 4314,9342007-08 Skier Visit Graph
2006-07$66.002006-07 Ticket Price Graph$1259.002006-07 Season Pass Price Graph19.1 daysNovember 22May 62006-07 Skier Visit Graph
2005-06$63.002005-06 Ticket Price Graph$1319.002005-06 Season Pass Price Graph20.9 daysApril 30262,0322005-06 Skier Visit Graph
2004-052004-05 Ticket Price Graph2004-05 Season Pass Price GraphApril 22295,9692004-05 Skier Visit Graph
2003-042003-04 Ticket Price Graph2003-04 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 30April 17264,8522003-04 Skier Visit Graph
2002-03$57.002002-03 Ticket Price Graph$1350.002002-03 Season Pass Price Graph23.7 daysNovember 20296,9332002-03 Skier Visit Graph
2001-02$55.002001-02 Ticket Price Graph2001-02 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 23April 14305,0812001-02 Skier Visit Graph
2000-01$55.002000-01 Ticket Price Graph2000-01 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 20April 29359,0002000-01 Skier Visit Graph
1999-001999-00 Ticket Price Graph1999-00 Season Pass Price GraphApril 23352,0001999-00 Skier Visit Graph
1990s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1998-991998-99 Ticket Price Graph$1299.001998-99 Season Pass Price GraphMay 2368,0001998-99 Skier Visit Graph
1997-98$47.001997-98 Ticket Price Graph$1099.001997-98 Season Pass Price Graph23.4 days388,0001997-98 Skier Visit Graph
1995-961995-96 Ticket Price Graph1995-96 Season Pass Price Graph380,0001995-96 Skier Visit Graph
1994-95$42.001994-95 Ticket Price Graph1994-95 Season Pass Price Graph1994-95 Skier Visit Graph
1992-93$29.001992-93 Ticket Price Graph1992-93 Season Pass Price Graph1992-93 Skier Visit Graph
1991-92$38.001991-92 Ticket Price Graph1991-92 Season Pass Price Graph1991-92 Skier Visit Graph
1990-91$38.001990-91 Ticket Price Graph1990-91 Season Pass Price Graph1990-91 Skier Visit Graph
1989-90$35.001989-90 Ticket Price Graph1989-90 Season Pass Price Graph1989-90 Skier Visit Graph
1980s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1988-89$33.001988-89 Ticket Price Graph1988-89 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 24April 241988-89 Skier Visit Graph
1987-88$32.001987-88 Ticket Price Graph1987-88 Season Pass Price Graph1987-88 Skier Visit Graph
1986-87$30.001986-87 Ticket Price Graph1986-87 Season Pass Price Graph1986-87 Skier Visit Graph
1984-85$26.001984-85 Ticket Price Graph1984-85 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 221984-85 Skier Visit Graph
1983-841983-84 Ticket Price Graph1983-84 Season Pass Price GraphMay 221983-84 Skier Visit Graph
1982-83$23.001982-83 Ticket Price Graph1982-83 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 151982-83 Skier Visit Graph
1981-82$21.001981-82 Ticket Price Graph1981-82 Season Pass Price GraphMay 241981-82 Skier Visit Graph
1980-811980-81 Ticket Price Graph1980-81 Season Pass Price Graph450,0001980-81 Skier Visit Graph
1979-80$17.001979-80 Ticket Price Graph1979-80 Season Pass Price Graph1979-80 Skier Visit Graph
1970s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1978-79$16.001978-79 Ticket Price Graph1978-79 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 261978-79 Skier Visit Graph
1977-781977-78 Ticket Price Graph1977-78 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 281977-78 Skier Visit Graph
1976-77$13.001976-77 Ticket Price Graph1976-77 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 201976-77 Skier Visit Graph
1975-76$12.001975-76 Ticket Price Graph1975-76 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 271975-76 Skier Visit Graph
1974-75$12.001974-75 Ticket Price Graph1974-75 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 301974-75 Skier Visit Graph
1973-74$10.001973-74 Ticket Price Graph1973-74 Season Pass Price Graph1973-74 Skier Visit Graph
1971-72$10.001971-72 Ticket Price Graph1971-72 Season Pass Price Graph1971-72 Skier Visit Graph
1970-711970-71 Ticket Price Graph1970-71 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 261970-71 Skier Visit Graph
1969-70$9.501969-70 Ticket Price Graph1969-70 Season Pass Price GraphOctober 251969-70 Skier Visit Graph
1960s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1968-69$7.001968-69 Ticket Price Graph1968-69 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 71968-69 Skier Visit Graph
1967-68$7.001967-68 Ticket Price Graph1967-68 Season Pass Price Graph1967-68 Skier Visit Graph
1966-67$8.001966-67 Ticket Price Graph$150.001966-67 Season Pass Price Graph18.8 days1966-67 Skier Visit Graph
1965-661965-66 Ticket Price Graph1965-66 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 201965-66 Skier Visit Graph
1964-65$7.001964-65 Ticket Price Graph1964-65 Season Pass Price Graph1964-65 Skier Visit Graph
1963-64$6.501963-64 Ticket Price Graph1963-64 Season Pass Price Graph1963-64 Skier Visit Graph
1962-63$6.501962-63 Ticket Price Graph1962-63 Season Pass Price Graph1962-63 Skier Visit Graph
1961-62$6.501961-62 Ticket Price Graph1961-62 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 2April 231961-62 Skier Visit Graph
1960-61$6.501960-61 Ticket Price Graph1960-61 Season Pass Price Graph1960-61 Skier Visit Graph
1959-60$6.501959-60 Ticket Price Graph1959-60 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 121959-60 Skier Visit Graph
1950s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1958-59$5.501958-59 Ticket Price Graph1958-59 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 201958-59 Skier Visit Graph

Visitor Memories
"I started skiing Sugarbush around 1959 or 1960 at age 22 or 23. After a few years I remember Stein Eriken came to the Bush, every Sunday at about 4:00 a crowd would gather and he would do his famous flip. We used to drive up from NYC every Friday Night and drive home on Sunday. Did this for many years. These were the days before snowmaking, I believe. If there was not enough snow, we would party all weekend. We had a group of friends and rented a house on route 100. I remember the gondola very well, there were a group of us who use to give the gondola operator a bottle of booze, and he would let us in the back door, so we would not have to stand in line . Still skiing mainly in Colorado. Best, Bob Michaels"
Bob Michaels, Feb. 21, 2020
"I started skiing the weekend the resort opened! Several years later as an editor of sports illustrated iwas made ski and travel editor. I commuted every weekend from New York with a ski club bus. I so loved the place that I became a member of Club Ten and bought a condo at Clariere near the nearr the gondola station Over the following years my ski writing career so flourished that I covered World Cup events and Olympic Games including squaw Squaw Valley Insbruck Portillo and Courchivelle-Albertville. By the time I hung up my treasured ski, I had skied 80 Ski areas across the globe and with such dazzling long Olympian champions as Killy, stein eriksen , nancy green, the Mahre brothers ,Jean Vuarnet. It all began on the gentle beginner slope at wonderful sugarbush! Fred smith"
Fred Smith, Dec. 18, 2017
"I remember my amazing mother, Esther J. Shropshire, teaching skiing to hundreds and hundreds of children at the Valley Day Care in the Village. Nice added feature for a daycare! She was riddled with arthritis, yet when she skied, she was so graceful and elegant - you would never even imagine she had any joint stiffness.What a powerful memory to retain from many years ago. (1976 was the year she started teaching there.)"
Cherwyn Ambuter, Aug. 11, 2015
"I remember a family trip to Sugarbush in February 1971 when I broke my leg on the second day of what was to be week long trip. My Dad and I were coming down Middle Earth after lunch and were about halfway down when I turned poorly in some heavy snow and broke my tibia. I remember it seemed like the ski patrol got to me so fast. The ride down on their sled seemed forever. Then I was off to a local doctor's and had a full cast put on and we drove home the next day getting into a pretty bad snowstorm. I felt badly to cut my sister out of a ski holiday ... I skied Sugarbush, Glen Ellen and Mad River for years after ...Best,Danny"
DT Teaze, Dec. 29, 2013
Add a memory of Sugarbush Resort
First Name:
Last Name:
E-Mail Address:
Comments:



External Links
  • Sugarbush Resort - official site
  • Mt. Ellen - FranklinSites.com Hiking Guide
  • Last updated: May 11, 2021

    Also on NewEnglandSkiHistory.com...
    A monorail served ski area?
    A monorail served ski area?
    A grand hotel in northern New Hampshire
    A grand hotel in northern New Hampshire
    A classic trail cut by the Civilian Conservation Corps
    A classic trail cut by the Civilian Conservation Corps
    From a small area to a mega resort
    From a small area to a mega resort
    Will Tenney's lifts spin again?
    Will Tenney's lifts spin again?
    The Puzzle of Evergreen Valley
    The Puzzle of Evergreen Valley
       CCC Trails    Cancelled Ski Areas    Expansions    Lifts    Management    Maps    News    Then and Now    Timelines    Topics    In The Press    Links    Site Map    What's New    Feedback

    Copyright 2002-2019, All Rights Reserved.