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The base area (2011)
Burke Mountain Resort
Burke, Vermont
Status: Open
First Season:1955-56
Vertical Drop:2011 feet
Standing Lifts:2 high speed quads, surface lifts
Past Lifts:1 quad, 2 doubles, surface lifts
Left: The base area (2011)
Recent NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News:
8/14/2020: Former Jay Peak Owner Pleads Guilty to Federal Charges
5/22/2019: Former Jay Peak, Burke Owners Indicted
8/14/2018: Sale of Jay Peak and Burke Mountain Delayed
7/12/2018: Vermont Settles with Quiros, Stenger over Jay Peak, Burke Sc...
SkiNewEngland.net Profile
Located in northeastern Vermont, 3,267 foot Burke Mountain towers over the surrounding landscape.

Elmer A. Darling
Elmer Darling (1907 Boston Globe feature)
Elmer Darling (1907 Boston Globe feature)

The Darling family's Burke lineage reportedly dates back to the War of 1812, when Major Ebenezer Darling came to the small town. His grandson Elmer was born in East Burke in 1848 and eventually studied architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Elmer then moved to New York City, where he started working for his uncle at the Fifth Avenue Hotel. By 1883, he reportedly had an ownership stake in the business.

Around that time, Darling began acquiring vast amounts of land in Burke, creating a working estate operated by his brother and sister called Mountain View. Circa 1904, work began on his dream mansion, overlooking Burke Mountain. Built to Darling's specifications, the three-story colonial included granite quarried from nearby Kirby, as well as locally sourced limestone and lumber. The name of the $300,000 mansion, "Burklyn," was "whimsically made up from the names of Burke and Lyndon" because it was situated on the town line.

By this point, Darling also owned thousands of acres of land on and around Burke Mountain. In 1906, work began on a carriage road to the top of Burke Mountain. At the time, the route was said to be "a little north east of where the present path is now" and was led by John Keach. The road was later described as being "for the daring to negotiate." A lookout tower was constructed atop that road circa 1912.

Elmer Darling passed away on April 11, 1931 at the age of 83. Having never married, he left his fortune to numerous local and regional entities and bequeathed his vast property to his brother Lucius and nephew Henry. Later that year, word emerged of plans to construct an auto road to the summit of Burke Mountain. The summit lookout tower collapsed under the weight of sleet and ice storms during the winter of 1931-32.

Darling State Forest Park

In June 1933, Governor Stanley Wilson accepted a gift of several hundred acres (later noted as 1,800 acres) from the Darlings for the development of a state forest. State forestry commissioner Perry Merrill announced the deployment of 200 Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) members to East Burke to construct Camp 131. Work quickly started on an auto road to the summit, with one mile constructed by December. The initial gravel road and new 37 foot tall summit fire tower were likely completed in 1934. It is possible that this road was advertised as a ski trail during the winter of 1934-35. The paved road was completed in 1935 and formally opened in October with Governor Charles Smith and a crowd of 3,000 on hand. The road was officially commissioned as the "Perry Merrill Highway." Other features included picnic areas, log shelters, and foot paths.

CCC Ski Trails
Burke Mountain before the clearing of the lift line
Burke Mountain before the clearing of the lift line

For the 1935-36 season, three ski trails were advertised. According to the Burlington Free Press, there were "three ski runs on the mountain with vertical descents of about 1200 feet besides the automobile road to the summit." According to the Montpelier Argus, the three trails were the "Bear Bend" (0.75 mile), the Amateur run (1.25 miles), and the Wilderness run (0.75 mile). Camp superintendent (and former state highway department engineer) Ray Estabrooks was credited leading the auto road and ski trail construction. The Caledonia Ski Association "tried out all these runs" just before Christmas 1935.

The new "13 Club" of St. Johnsbury hosted its first downhill race at Burke on January 12, 1936, with local student Chester Witters winning the race down the two mile auto road with a time of 4 minutes.

According to the Burlington Free Press, there were three downhill runs at Burke for the winter of 1937-38: Bear's Den (one mile long, 15-30 feet wide, 1,300 feet vertical drop), Wilderness Run (one mile long, 15-30 feet wide, 1,200 feet vertical drop), Automobile Parkway (1.75 miles long, 25-35 feet wide, 1,250 feet vertical drop). A 65 acre open slope was also advertised, with a 600 foot vertical drop. Though the 13 Club and Lyndon Outing Club co-sponsored racing that winter, the latter soon became the dominant force on the mountain.

The second tower atop Burke Mountain was likely destroyed by the September 1938 New England hurricane. A new tower was constructed circa 1939 or 1940.

The Lyndon Outing Club hosted the first annual Northeastern Vermont downhill competition during the winter of 1938-39. Initially planned for January, the race was postponed until mid-February, taking place on the Bear Den Trail. Though racing activity grew in subsequent years, momentum was lost with the onset of World War II, as many key Lyndon Outing Club members joined the war effort.

In early 1946, Perry Merrill pledged to help clear one of the ski trails to host the New England Interscholastic Ski Championships could be held the following winter. The race was held in February 1947 with Lyndon Institute taking first place. Though mild weather impacted subsequent racing activity, rumors began to emerge of further investments in the ski development.

A 90-foot communication tower was constructed atop the mountain in 1947 for the state police. For perhaps the first time, a snow cat was used on the mountain in early 1948, transporting equipment for the tower.

Ski Burke Mountain, Inc.
Ski Burke Mountain, Inc. Board of Directors (1955)
Ski Burke Mountain, Inc. Board of Directors (1955)

As the 1950s progressed, interest in a Burke Mountain development grew while the ski trails became overgrown. Though the Lyndon Outing Club did not want to lead the effort, it did pledge its support for the prospective development. The Burke Mountain Recreational Committee was formed in early 1953 to help drive the Burke project with Herbert Gregory serving as chairman, as well as the involvement of Cedric Sherrer, Clayton Rice, Crawford Davis, Howard Higgins, Albert Facteau, Robert Lewis, and William Stone. Soon thereafter, Representative Graham Newell introduced legislation to provide $10,000 to clear the Wilderness Run and convert Bear Den into a Class A racing trail. Charles Lord, who had laid out the original Bear Den trail, and Cedric Sherrer, an accomplished racer, surveyed the improvements that summer. Sherrer and Jerry Baril supervised the on-hill work. Governor Lee Emerson noted that the funding was the first step, "paving the way for the entrance of private capital into a project which some day will greatly enhance our facilities for expanded winter sports business, and hence additional income."

Related to this effort, in August 1953, Milton Kerr (former president of Lyndon Outing Club) and Clarence Akley filed to issue 12 shares of stock at $50 per share in a company named Ski Burke Mountain, Inc.

In late January 1955, Milton Kerr announced Ski Burke Mountain, Inc. had rented a snow cat and trailer to bring people to the top of the mountain. The goal of the rental was to test a snow cat on the mountain and to see if there was enough interest to proceed with development of a ski area. 175 people were transported via the snow cat during a late January weekend. By this point, the corporation had 14 stockholders.

Lift Served Skiing

Burke Mountain circa 1956
Burke Mountain circa 1956

On April 22, 1955, Ski Burke Mountain, Inc. announced plans to construct a Pomalift. A deadline of June 1 was set for raising $50,000 via the sale of stock ($10 per share), which could cover the cost of acquiring and installing the lift, as well as initial operating expenses. In addition to the 5,200 foot long, 1,520 vertical foot Pomalift, first-season plans called for a 1,200 foot rope tow and the purchase of at least one snow cat. Operations were premised on a 75-day season. Corporation officers made the rounds, enlisting local civic organizations in the sale of stock.

As the June 1 deadline approached, it was clear that Ski Burke Mountain, Inc. was woefully below its goal, with only $17,500 purchased or pledged. Adding to the difficulties, initial lift line surveys were found to be in need of revision, in part because the state did not want the lift interfering with the summit parking lot or views. Meanwhile, Governor Joseph Johnson approved allocating $7,500 for the construction of a lodge, with the state planning to lease the operations to a third party.

Development of Burke Mountain (1955-1956)
Development of Burke Mountain (1955-1956)

With sales and commitments still $12,000 short of the $50,000 goal, on July 18, Ski Burke Mountain, Inc. voted to order the Pomalift. The corporation formally signed a purchase agreement for the lift on August 12, 1955, providing a $8,700 down payment. Clearing and excavation commenced on September 16, followed by concrete work in November, both handled by Avon Atkins Construction Company. Realizing that $50,000 would not be adequate to complete the ski area, Ski Burke Mountain, Inc. voted to increase its capitalization to $200,000 in November.

By the end of November, the Pomalift parts were sailing across the Atlantic, while Douglas Wood and David "Duffy" Dodge installed the rope tow. Meanwhile, a new 7,200 volt electric line extension was constructed by Lyndonville Electric to power the lifts. The Pomalift parts began arriving at Burke in mid-December.

Construction of the Pomalift progressed into January, as Ski Burke Mountain, Inc. continued putting out pleas for additional stock sales as it felt the financial crunch. By late January, the corporation was said to be "in financial stress" with tens of thousands of dollars in outstanding bills. To augment stock sales, directors sought to sell notes carrying a 6 percent interest rate.

In mid-January, upon returning from Olympic tryouts, Cedric Sherrer was named trail supervisor and ski patrol director.

After some delays reportedly related to a lack of snow, the rope tow began operating on Saturday, January 28, 1956. The Pomalift opened one day later, serving some 400 skiers. John Bisson, a Ski Burke Mountain, Inc. director who had recently been awarded the food concession by the state, purchased the first lift-ticket book.

Trails during the first winter included the CCC-constructed Bear Den Trail, Wilderness Trail, and Skyline Run (the toll road), as well as three new trails named Center Trail, Little Dipper, and Big Dipper. To bolster interest, Ski Burke Mountain, Inc. offered free skiing to all local schools on Monday through Thursday afternoons.

Burke Mountain was formally dedicated on February 12, 1956 with a crowd estimated at 1,500 on hand. Governor Johnson, sporting a black eye from a recent skiing mishap at Stowe, took the first Poma ride for the official opening.

A new $126,000 access road was completed in 1958, improving the winter approach to the ski area. At this point, the ski area was served by the Poma lift and a rope tow.

From Surface to Aerial

Burke Mountain circa the late 1950s or early 1960s
Burke Mountain circa the late 1950s or early 1960s

While Burke was operating as a sizable surface lift area for a decade, the growing Vermont ski industry threatened to leave it behind. As such, a major expansion took place for the 1966-67 season, centered around the installation of Burke's first chairlift. In addition to the lift, the base lodge was doubled in size and 20 acres of skiable terrain added.

Additional trails and a Poma lift were advertised as added for the 1968-69 season. Warren Witherell established Burke Mountain Academy near the ski area in 1970. The popular racing trail Warren's Way was later named for the legendary coach.

Coinciding with the extension of Interstate 91 through Lyndonville, a lower mountain chairlift and base lodge were added for 1978-79 season, pushing the ski area's vertical drop over the 2,000 foot mark. While the new complex seemed promising, it reportedly lacked snowmaking and thus sat idle for its first two seasons. Though future expansion was planned for East Bowl and West Peak, the area reportedly went bankrupt in 1987.

Bankruptcies

Developer Paul Quinn acquired Burke in September 1987 with plans to turn it into a four season resort featuring 11 lifts, including relocating the summit double to East Bowl and opening West Peak. While summit double chairlift was upgraded to a fixed grip quad for the 1988-89 season, progress stalled as the real estate market went south. Burke would go on to struggle financially, declaring bankruptcy in 1990.

Bernd and Karin Schaefers acquired the ski area circa the fall of 1991. Plans were announced to turn Burke into a center for film festivals, a la Sundance, as well as constructing a Bavarian castle themed hotel and microbrewery. However, Burke was once again bankrupt in 1995.

The Northern Star Ski Corporation acquired Burke in 1995 and began improving the trails and infrastructure. However, after back to back bad seasons, Northern Star President Andy Holmes announced the area's lender had withdrawn and that an ownership change would be imminent.

In September of 2000, Burke Mountain Academy acquired the ski area at auction for a reported $300,000, placing it in a company called Burke 2000 LLC. In 2005, the area was transferred to Lubert-Adler and the Ginn Corporation.

A Major Ski Area Once Again

The Poma and Mid Burke Express (2013)
The Poma and Mid Burke Express (2013)

Following the acquisition, Burke underwent a significant transformation, as its first high speed quad opened on the lower mountain for the 2005-06 season.

Soon thereafter, the Ginn-Lubert-Adler partnership came under severe strain as the real estate crisis escalated. Burke 2000 was eventually placed under LRA BURSKI, LLC, which was in turn owned by Lubert-Adler's Legacy Resort Assets.

A second high speed quad was announced for the 2011-12 season, though installation hit some snags. Initially intended to be a refurbished lift from Ascutney, negotiations didn't work out. As a result, a new Leitner-Poma high speed quad was purchased, opening on Christmas Eve.

The Rise and Fall of Q Burke

The last days of Q Burke (April 2016)
The last days of Q Burke (April 2016)

Perhaps in part due to the financial strain of the poor 2011-2012 winter, as well as the finances needed to install and operate the new lift, LRA BURSKI, LLC sold the ski area to Jay Peak owner Ariel Quiros in May 2012 for $7.26 million.

While on mountain investment was made into the snowmaking system, Quiros and business partner Bill Stenger quickly turned their attention to a $98 million investment plan involving a hotel, conference center, aquatic center, and tennis facility. Quiros and Stenger had previous experience with the EB-5 program, as they had raised hundreds of millions of dollars to fund projects at Jay Peak.

Quiros formally renamed the ski area to Q Burke Mountain Resort in 2013, prompting scorn from many longtime skiers and local residents.

In June 2014, ground was broken for the $50 million hotel, which was expected to open for the 2015-16 season. While construction was completed in early 2016, the hotel remained closed.

On April 13, 2016, the Securities and Exchange Commission raided and took control of Q Burke, alleging that Quiros and business partner Bill Stenger defrauded EB-5 immigrant investors with a complex Ponzi scheme. Leisure Hotels and Resorts was installed as the operator while the government appointed receiver worked to stabilize and eventually sell the ski area. Later that month, the Burke Mountain name was restored, coinciding with reassurances that the hotel would debut in the fall and that the ski area would remain operating.

The last days of the Burke Poma (March 2017)
The last days of the Burke Poma (March 2017)

With the area now operating under a receivership, the Poma lift served its last skiers in the spring of 2017. The historic lift was removed that summer, making way for a new high-speed T-Bar.

NewEnglandSkiConditions.com Reports
Month Average Percent of Terrain Open
January97%    (2 reports)97 Open
February100%    (1 report)100 Open
March100%    (3 reports)100 Open
Recent Conditions Reports
Mar. 8, 2020 by nordicgal
Loose Granular, Frozen Granular
Feb. 17, 2020 by nhalex
Packed Powder, Frozen Granular
Jan. 13, 2019 by rocket21
Packed Powder, Packed Powder
Jan. 13, 2019 by brianna
Packed Powder, Powder
Mar. 24, 2018 by rocket21
Loose Granular, Packed Powder
Burke Mountain Resort on NewEnglandSkiConditions.com

NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News
Recent Articles
Former Jay Peak Owner Pleads Guilty to Federal Charges - Aug. 14, 2020
Former Jay Peak, Burke Owners Indicted - May. 22, 2019
Sale of Jay Peak and Burke Mountain Delayed - Aug. 14, 2018
Vermont Settles with Quiros, Stenger over Jay Peak, Burke Scheme - Jul. 12, 2018
Receiver: Jay Peak and Burke To Be Sold This Year - Feb. 15, 2018
Quiros Surrenders Jay Peak and Burke in SEC Settlement - Feb. 2, 2018
Burke Employee Killed in Snowcat Accident - Dec. 18, 2017
Lift Construction Season Enters Final Phase - Oct. 29, 2017
SEC Reaches Partial Agreement with Quiros in Jay Peak EB-5 Case - Aug. 22, 2017
Bill Stenger Under Fire for Role in Burke T-Bar Project - May. 2, 2017
Burke Mountain Resort NewEnglandSkiIndustry.com News Page

Expansion History
Project
Season
East Bowl
Open
Sherburne Area
Open
1978-79
West Bowl
Proposed
Cutter Area
Proposed

Image Gallery
1957-58 Eastern Ski MapJanuary 11, 1959 Boston Globe1962-63 Eastern Ski Map1964-65 Eastern Ski Map1970-71 Eastern Ski Map1971-72 Eastern Ski Map
View All Images in Burke Mountain Resort Image Gallery
Lifts
Click on lift name for information and photos
Standing Lifts
Installed
The J-Bar in 2011
J-Bar
Hall
J-Bar
The bottom of the Mid Burke Express
Mid-Burke Express
Leitner-Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
2011-12
The Sheburne Express during installation in 2005
Sherburne Express
Leitner-Poma
Chairlift - Quad - Detachable
2005-06
The base terminal (2018)
T-Bar
Leitner-Poma
T-Bar
2017-18

Past Lifts
Seasons
Dippers Poma
Poma
Platter
1968-69
-
Novice Poma
Poma
Platter
1962-63
-
The Poma in 2013
Poma
Poma
Platter
1955-56
-
2016-17
The Sheburne Double during removal in 2005
Sherburne Double
Hall
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1978-79
-
2004-05
The Summit Double in the 1960s
Summit Double
Hall
Chairlift - Double - Fixed
1966-67
-
1987-88
The T-Bar in the 1960s
T-Bar
Hall
T-Bar
1965-66
-
The top of the Willoughby Quad in 2011
Willoughby Quad
CTEC
Chairlift - Quad - Fixed
1988-89
-
2017-18

Maps
2020-21 Burke Trail Map
1955-56 Burke Mountain Trail Map1957-58 Burke Mountain Trail Map1973-74 Burke trail map1976-77 Burke Mountain Trail Map1984-85 Burke trail map1999-00 Burke Mountain Trail Map
View All Burke Mountain Resort Trail Maps

Year by Year History
Adult Weekend Full Day Lift Ticket; Adult Full Price Unlimited Season Pass
2020s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2020-21$77.002020-21 Ticket Price Graph$999.002020-21 Season Pass Price Graph13.0 daysDecember 19April 42020-21 Skier Visit Graph
2019-20$75.002019-20 Ticket Price Graph$979.002019-20 Season Pass Price Graph13.1 daysDecember 7March 142019-20 Skier Visit Graph
2010s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2018-19$73.002018-19 Ticket Price Graph$959.002018-19 Season Pass Price Graph13.1 daysNovember 23April 142018-19 Skier Visit Graph
2017-18$69.002017-18 Ticket Price Graph$929.002017-18 Season Pass Price Graph13.5 daysDecember 1April 152017-18 Skier Visit Graph
2016-17$64.002016-17 Ticket Price Graph$899.002016-17 Season Pass Price Graph14.0 daysDecember 2April 162016-17 Skier Visit Graph
2015-16$64.002015-16 Ticket Price Graph$899.002015-16 Season Pass Price Graph14.0 daysJanuary 1March 272015-16 Skier Visit Graph
2014-15$64.002014-15 Ticket Price Graph$899.002014-15 Season Pass Price Graph14.0 daysDecember 13April 52014-15 Skier Visit Graph
2013-14$68.002013-14 Ticket Price Graph$799.002013-14 Season Pass Price Graph11.8 daysDecember 14April 132013-14 Skier Visit Graph
2012-13$68.002012-13 Ticket Price Graph$799.002012-13 Season Pass Price Graph11.8 daysDecember 1April 775,2472012-13 Skier Visit Graph
2011-12$68.002011-12 Ticket Price Graph$699.002011-12 Season Pass Price Graph10.3 daysDecember 17March 2461,1402011-12 Skier Visit Graph
2010-11$66.002010-11 Ticket Price Graph2010-11 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 11April 1076,4052010-11 Skier Visit Graph
2009-10$59.002009-10 Ticket Price Graph$629.002009-10 Season Pass Price Graph10.7 daysApril 42009-10 Skier Visit Graph
2000s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
2008-09$57.002008-09 Ticket Price Graph2008-09 Season Pass Price GraphApril 52008-09 Skier Visit Graph
2007-08$54.002007-08 Ticket Price Graph2007-08 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 8April 62007-08 Skier Visit Graph
2006-07$54.002006-07 Ticket Price Graph$599.002006-07 Season Pass Price Graph11.1 daysDecember 92006-07 Skier Visit Graph
2005-06$52.002005-06 Ticket Price Graph$599.002005-06 Season Pass Price Graph11.5 daysDecember 20April 22005-06 Skier Visit Graph
2004-05$47.002004-05 Ticket Price Graph$569.002004-05 Season Pass Price Graph12.1 daysApril 32004-05 Skier Visit Graph
2002-03$39.002002-03 Ticket Price Graph$579.002002-03 Season Pass Price Graph14.8 days2002-03 Skier Visit Graph
2001-02$39.002001-02 Ticket Price Graph$529.002001-02 Season Pass Price Graph13.6 days2001-02 Skier Visit Graph
2000-01$39.002000-01 Ticket Price Graph2000-01 Season Pass Price GraphApril 12000-01 Skier Visit Graph
1999-00$42.001999-00 Ticket Price Graph1999-00 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 4March 271999-00 Skier Visit Graph
1990s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1998-991998-99 Ticket Price Graph1998-99 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 121998-99 Skier Visit Graph
1996-971996-97 Ticket Price Graph1996-97 Season Pass Price GraphApril 61996-97 Skier Visit Graph
1994-95$22.001994-95 Ticket Price Graph1994-95 Season Pass Price GraphMarch 261994-95 Skier Visit Graph
1993-941993-94 Ticket Price Graph1993-94 Season Pass Price GraphApril 31993-94 Skier Visit Graph
1992-93$32.001992-93 Ticket Price Graph1992-93 Season Pass Price Graph1992-93 Skier Visit Graph
1991-92$30.001991-92 Ticket Price Graph1991-92 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 291991-92 Skier Visit Graph
1990-91$30.001990-91 Ticket Price Graph1990-91 Season Pass Price GraphNovember 231990-91 Skier Visit Graph
1989-90$28.001989-90 Ticket Price Graph1989-90 Season Pass Price Graph1989-90 Skier Visit Graph
1980s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1988-89$26.001988-89 Ticket Price Graph1988-89 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 101988-89 Skier Visit Graph
1987-88$24.001987-88 Ticket Price Graph1987-88 Season Pass Price Graph1987-88 Skier Visit Graph
1986-87$22.001986-87 Ticket Price Graph1986-87 Season Pass Price Graph1986-87 Skier Visit Graph
1984-85$18.001984-85 Ticket Price Graph1984-85 Season Pass Price Graph1984-85 Skier Visit Graph
1983-84$17.001983-84 Ticket Price Graph1983-84 Season Pass Price Graph1983-84 Skier Visit Graph
1982-83$15.001982-83 Ticket Price Graph1982-83 Season Pass Price Graph1982-83 Skier Visit Graph
1981-82$15.001981-82 Ticket Price Graph1981-82 Season Pass Price Graph1981-82 Skier Visit Graph
1980-81$14.001980-81 Ticket Price Graph1980-81 Season Pass Price Graph1980-81 Skier Visit Graph
1970s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1978-79$12.001978-79 Ticket Price Graph1978-79 Season Pass Price Graph1978-79 Skier Visit Graph
1977-78$10.001977-78 Ticket Price Graph1977-78 Season Pass Price Graph1977-78 Skier Visit Graph
1976-77$9.001976-77 Ticket Price Graph1976-77 Season Pass Price Graph1976-77 Skier Visit Graph
1975-76$8.001975-76 Ticket Price Graph1975-76 Season Pass Price Graph1975-76 Skier Visit Graph
1974-75$8.001974-75 Ticket Price Graph1974-75 Season Pass Price Graph1974-75 Skier Visit Graph
1973-74$8.001973-74 Ticket Price Graph1973-74 Season Pass Price Graph1973-74 Skier Visit Graph
1969-70$7.001969-70 Ticket Price Graph1969-70 Season Pass Price Graph1969-70 Skier Visit Graph
1960s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1959-60$4.501959-60 Ticket Price Graph1959-60 Season Pass Price Graph1959-60 Skier Visit Graph
1950s Ticket Price Season Pass Price
Pass Payback
Opening Day
Closing Day
Skier Visits
1957-581957-58 Ticket Price Graph1957-58 Season Pass Price GraphDecember 141957-58 Skier Visit Graph
1956-57$4.001956-57 Ticket Price Graph$75.001956-57 Season Pass Price Graph18.8 daysDecember 29March 309,0001956-57 Skier Visit Graph
1955-561955-56 Ticket Price Graph1955-56 Season Pass Price GraphJanuary 281955-56 Skier Visit Graph

Visitor Memories
"skied Burke between 1962 and 1966. Stayed with the Kolars at Winape in West Charleston every year between Christmas and New Years and at Easter, if there was still snow- great times with a bunch of friends. Loved the Poma, the Bear Den and Toll Road and just being in Vermont in the winter. Also one of the best weeks of Spring skiing ever for Easter vacation in about 1965/1966. After I moved to Cabot in 1973, I then brought my little sister to Burke in 1973 with her friend and we all had a great time at Burke. A wonderful place to ski. I haven't been back to ski Burke in many years, but glad Burke is still going strong."
David Tweed Reid, Feb. 13, 2021
"Love Burke! First skied there early 1970s, the addition of the detachable has been great, & now it's the last run of the poma as word is a t-bar will replace it next year. I'll miss the poma lift! Love the mid mountain lodge -- great blend of the old & new & the trails rock"
Stephen Garfield, Feb. 2, 2017
"First skied here in the 59/60 season. As I remember one long Poma platter pull lift to the top, and a rope tow just below the lodge. I was a member of the Lyndon Institute ski team. Although not very good at racing I enjoyed the skiing. Lyndon had the New England state champion high school ski team that year. The coach was Don Erskin. Team members included the Beattie brothers, all three of the Smith brothers, Art Sanborn, Dave Jenkins, Peter King, Greg Peck, Gary Cassidy, to name a few. We used to take the old 'red bus' up to the area for practice and meets. It was an old, maybe 47-48 Chevy sedan, chopped in half and a section added in the middle. Looked like an old fashioned limo. With no heat! I taught my future wife how to ski on the rope tow slope in the early 60's. We still take a run or two at Mt Baker here in Washington. Glad to see the area is still operating."
Ernie Hutchins, Jan. 23, 2014
"My Aunt and Uncle used to own a condo there at the base of the beginner chair, and I skied there several times in the 1980s, back when they still had just two double chairs and the two pomalifts too. Because we were by then Colorado skiers my 1st wife and I really liked the wide trails over by the Dipper poma and I thought that maybe they should have replaced that lift with a chair and possibly extended it further uphill too, which might have helped mitigate that really long walk back from the East Bowl somewhat too.Better yet, why not an East Bowl lift and snowmaking over there too?Back when the main mountain chair was a double it used to get pretty crowded, and then we would ride the school poma instead, which covered probably 2/3rds of the vertical anyway, as it never had any lift line either. I did ski there once after the fixed-grip quad was installed and that new lift did-in most of the waiting in liftlines too. My aunt and uncle sold their place there sometime in the 1990s and I haven't been back since. Maybe under Jay's ownership some of the long-promised improvements can be undertaken and Burke can realize all of the promise that so many people saw in the place over many years only to be left disappointed for so many years too. "
Mark Richardson, Mar. 2, 2013
"In the 60s and early 70s I lived in Littleton NH but used to ski Burke rather than Cannon Mt because of the lack of lift lines. Many a frosty morn my two daughters amd myself would get up early and load the car and off to Burke for a great day of sking. in the late 50s and early 60s I remember the poma lift. "
Barry Story, Feb. 5, 2013
"My entire childhood from third grade to graduation was wrapped around the ski season at Burke. Every year that season tickets were available I got an early Christmas present. Favorite trail then was The Powderhorn. I made lifetime friends riding the Saturday bus from St. J to the mountain and I fell in love there for the first time to my 8th grade sweetheart. What that really means is the chairlift ride became romantic. It still takes my breath away 37 years later when my husband and I (not the guy from the chairlift) drive to the top in the summer or fall while we're there visiting. It was a safe place then in the late 60's and 70's, where you could pack a lunch, leave it on a table and it would still be there when you got back. The french fries from the snack bar were "
Susan Ali Swain, Jan. 25, 2013
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External Links
  • Burke Mountain - official site
  • Burke Mountain - FranklinSites.com Hiking Guide
  • Burke Mountain Academy
  • Last updated: July 20, 2021

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